Genus Hemicycliophora

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ORDER RHABDITIDA
INFRAORDER TYLENCHOMORPHA
            Family Hemicycliophoridae
                        Genus Hemicycliophora

"Cuticular layer always appearing double, generally loose, never membranous. Typically two cephalic annuli (exceptionally three), usually not modified or separate. Vulva a transverse slit over half of body diameter long. Vagina straight or curved but not sigmoid. Labial region of male marked by a discontinuity in body annulation, usually offset, labial framework in lateral view appearing as 'spectacles mark'. Spicules arcuate, semicircular, U- or hook-shaped. Lips of cloaca forming a penial tube bearing a single hypothygma at its tip. Bursa covering less than one-third of tail (diagnosis following Raski and Luc, 1987)." Bert and Borgonie, 2006

Genus Hemicycliophora de Man, 1921
“Female: Extra cuticular layer always present, generally loose, never membranous. Labial annuli two (exceptionally three) not modified or separated (except H. hesperis and H. truncata). Vulva a transverse slit over half of body diameter long. Vagina straight or curved but not sigmoid.
 Male: Labial region marked by a discontinuity in body annulation, usually offset; labial framework in lateral view appearing as “spectacle mark.” Spicules arcuate, semi- circular, U- or hook-shaped. Lips of cloaca forming a penial tube bearing a single hypoptygma at its tip. Caudal alae covering less than one-third of the tail. Tail longer than that of female.
 Juvenile: Fourth-stage male juvenile without stylet.” From Powers and Mullin website http://nematode.unl.edu/
This genus was found at KBS by Quintanilla Tornel, but it is not mentioned by Freckman and Ettema 1993.


References:

Bert, W.and G. Borgonie. Order Rhabditida: Suborder Tylenchina.  2006.  In: Eyualem Abebe, Traunspurger W., and Andrassy I. (eds) Freshwater Nematodes: Ecology and Taxonomy. CABI Publishing, Cambridge, MA, pp. 684

Powers T. and P. Mullin. Plant and Insect Parasitic Nematodes. University of Nebraska Nematology Website. http://nematode.unl.edu/